Moog Minifoogers!

Moog, Minifoogers, Moogerfooger,

Moog is jumping into the downsizing game, with the release of its new line of Minifoogers.  These are the slicker, smaller, tighter versions of Moogerfoogers, which have long been at the top of my want list. Moogers are sort of like the Cadillac of guitar pedals; powerful, large, and a bit pricey. Now that the classic sound shapers are stuffed into a mini package, at a mini price, I’m not sure how long I can hold out!

The Minifooger family –  MF Drive, MF Boost, MF Delay, MF Ring, and MF Trem are all 100% analog, true bypass, hand assembled, and cost under $200. They can be controlled with an expression pedal or CV.

Queens of the Stone Age guitarist Troy Van Leeuwen demonstrates:

Minifooger Analog Effects Pedals

The MF Drive is a filter-based overdrive pedal employing a Moog Ladder Filter, boutique FET amplifiers, and OTAs in its drive section making it highly reactive to picking dynamics. The panel features a bi-polar tone control and sweepable filter that work dynamically with input gain to offer each player unique and customizable sounds that retain the core timbre of their instrument. A filter Peak switch shifts harmonic content to the filter’s cutoff position, adding new tonal creation and dirty wah performance possibilities not found in other drive pedals. MSRP: $179.

The MF Boost is a selectable topology boost pedal that allows the player to switch between an “articulate VCA” signal path and a “colored OTA” signal path. Each is tailored to deliver boutique amplifier sound and responsiveness from any guitar/amplifier combination. The design also imparts natural compression to an input signal, which brings out note articulation and significantly increases the performance of other effects pedals. When paired with an expression pedal, the MF Boost can be used as a tone enhancing volume pedal, sweepable-gain boost pedal, and VCA. The expression pedal input also provides access to higher gain values not available on the panel. MSRP: $149

The MF Delay features 35mS-700mS of completely analog delay time. At shorter settings, repeats are fast and bright for creating classic slap-back and plate sounds. At medium and long settings the repeats become darker and naturally trail into reverb-like state. A Drive circuit allows the player to adjust the tone and feel of the MF Delay as well as overdrive the Bucket Brigade Delay line, and the input of a guitar amplifier for bigger sound and feel. Also, the expression pedal input is switchable between feedback for expressive swells and delay time for tape delay and chorus/flange effects. MSRP: $209.

The MF Ring is an analog ring modulator that is based on the world’s best selling Ring Mod, the Moogerfooger MF-102.  Its refined frequency range and tone voicing circuit add new-musical elements to ring modification, making it easy to dial in everything from octaves and choral dissonance to harmonic undertones and synthesized lead lines. The expression pedal input provides hands-free control of the Freq parameter for sound sweeps, pitch shifting effects, and playing between two scales on the fly. MSRP: $159

The MF Trem is an analog tremolo pedal designed around a balanced modulator and Sub Audio VCO. This design creates a wide range of effects that are based on phase cancellation and addition. Players can create classic optical tremolo, hard tremolo, rotary effects and more that react dynamically to harmonic content. A variable Shape control interacts with Tone and Mix to craft subtle swells and gallops to rhythmic percussive, and swirling effects. When pushed, the MF Trem can also approach the beginnings of phasing and chorus. The expression pedal input adds control of the Speed parameter for hands-free swells and rotary effects. MSRP: $189

Minifooger Analog Effects Pedals are available for preorder from all authorized Moog dealers now. We will begin shipping the first units from our Asheville factory in October, 2013. For more information about Minifooger Analog Effects Pedals got to: MINIFOOGER.COM

Eventide H9 Harmonizer Packs Tons Of Classic Effects Into One Bluetooth Controlled Stompbox

Eventide, H9 Harmonizer, Bluetooth, guitar pedal

The trend of tech getting ever smaller is unmistakable. From Malekko’s super slim Omicron Series to the newly announced Dunlop Mini Fuzz Face, the guitar world is wisely following suit.

nano guitar

We’d better all start buying nano-machines like yesterday – this nano-guitar is already old news!

Eventide’s pedals have always been beasts – maybe a little TOO feature full and just a tad too big to fit comfortably on your pedal board.

The H9 solves the size problem, while only adding to the sonic mayhem. You see, Eventide has decided to go truly digital, pioneering the iOS-to-guitar pedal phenomenon and offering a true marriage of hardware and software. With its single knob, streamlined, HAL-esque interface, the H9 can run ALL of Eventide’s famous stompbox effects. All of the sound editing controls are still there – just tucked away into software. Connect wirelessly via Bluetooth with an iPod, iPhone or iPad, and you’re not only able to fully control the H9, you’re ready to download MOAR SOUNDZ (available through in-app purchase) to add to the already impressive collection included right out of the box:

THE H9 COMES LOADED WITH A SET OF OUR MOST POPULAR ALGORITHMS TAKEN FROM EVENTIDE’S AWARD-WINNING STOMPBOXES:

From ModFactor:

Liquid Chorus
Organic Chorus
Shimmer Chorus
Classic Chorus
Phase XO Chorus
Bias Tremolo
Opto Tremolo

 

From PitchFactor:
H910
H949
Crystals
Tuner

 

From TimeFactor:
Tape Echo
Vintage Delay

 

From Space:
Shimmer
Hall

 

Plus a new H9 exclusive:
UltraTap Delay™

 

While the H9 is fully controllable via its front panel, a free iOS app, H9 Control, can be downloaded to your iPhone or iPad for live editing, creating and managing presets and changing system settings wirelessly via Bluetooth. H9 Control will also be available for your PC or Mac via USB.

The H9 features stereo audio I/O, MIDI I/O, Expression Pedal, and Auxiliary Switch inputs. All of Eventide’s stompbox algorithms and their associated presets are available for in-app purchase.

Eventide H9 Harmonizer will be available in March of 2013 through authorized Eventide stompbox dealers.

Ich Bin Ein Auslander: Discovering Berlin

10.12.12 On a train from Berlin to Paris20121018-151100.jpg

After three days of wandering the stony streets of Berlin, I am leaving with sore feet and the desire to learn German for the next time I return.

For all the things we managed to squeeze into our brief stint there, many more remain undiscovered. Although we didn’t make it to the Museum of Musical Instruments, or hear Beethoven played at the Philharmonic, or dance to EDM at one of Berlin’s famed S&M parties, we did manage to visit a couple of musically relevant sites.

Upon arrival, we decided to beat our jet lag by powering through a second day without sleep. After a large latte macchiato (one of so many) we hopped on the subway to Kreutzberg, Berlin’s answer to NY’s East Village or Brooklyn. Located only steps from the Kotbusser Tor stop is Schneidersladen, a synthesizer museum and repair shop. Here you can sample a handful of boutique analog synths, sequencers, drum machines, and filters, all hooked up to a rack of headphones. You could get lost for hours in gooey analog knob twiddling trips, if time permitted.

20121018-152947.jpg

20121018-153203.jpg

20121018-153057.jpg

Around the corner, on Oranienstrasse, is a cool little music shop. Inside the innocuously named Central Music lives some truly killer rare gear, including a few old vintage tube radios repurposed as guitar amps by the friendly and quite knowledgable staff. I got to try an old Dearmond (fitted with humbuckers), a silver sparkle Ibanez Jet King with P90’s, and a fuzz pedal so boutique, I was told it was only the 26th of its kind in existence. The Sunnmachine Fuzz O))) delivers some nice dirt, which gets hairier at lower frequencies (great for detuners such as myself). It also offers a low pass filter and three different tone modes which feed different levels of low end into the circuit. Of course I found ‘Ultra Evil’ most fitting for my doom riffs.

20121018-153235.jpg